German passport Swiss issued Philippines Islands 1921
Albert Sidler, dodis-P5943-F1

German passport Swiss issued Philippines Islands 1921

This German passport issued by the Swiss on the Philippines Islands 1921 is indeed a historical passport treasure. Meet Otto Krohn from Hamburg, who was traveling to Germany via Suez and back to the Philippines Islands. On his route, he also stopped in Singapore, where he was not allowed to land. His Hong Kong visa says he can transfer in HK by the ship (can’t read the name clearly). His passport was extended, and further visas show Austria in Venice (Italy), Kufstein (Germany) and Italy.

Acting Swiss consul for the Philippines Islands was Albert Siedler, who signed the extension and served till July 1945 (from 1921), which makes it 24 years. Siedler died in 1952 at the age of 77.

A great document, issued for a German by the Swiss on the Philippine Islands (US territory). I believe it’s doubtful to find another such passport example. Happy to have it in my archive.

 

German passport Swiss issued Philippines Islands 1921German passport Swiss issued Philippines Islands 1921

 

Extract of Collier’s New Encyclopedia (1921)/Philippine Islands

Government.—A governor-general administers the authority of the United States. A complete civil central government was established in 1901, which includes four executive departments in charge of secretaries. The work of these is divided into several bureaus. Several necessary measures relating to the administration of the government have been passed since the American occupation. An act of 1902 provided for the creation of a legislative lower house called the assembly. An upper house also was created, and the two together formed the Philippine Legislature. The Assembly is composed of elected members from the regularly organized provinces, according to their population. The judicial system is also established, corresponding practically to the system in the United States.

History.—The The Philippines were discovered and visited by Spanish and Portuguese explorers. Magellan found on March 15, 1521, a group of islands which he named after St. Lazarus. This explorer lost his life in a battle with the natives a few weeks later on Mactan Island, near Cebu. The islands were taken into possession by Spain in 1565, and five years following the conquest of Luzon was carried on. In 1571 Manila was founded and rapidly became the seat of Spanish power. The Spaniards remained in possession of the islands practically undisturbed until the Spanish-American War. They made little progress in economic development, and their methods with the natives resulted in a bitter feeling, which gave rise to several attempts to secure independence. The most important of these was that under José Rizal, in 1896. This attempt was put down, and conditions were still threatening when the United States went to war with Spain over the independence of Cuba. A fleet under Admiral Dewey was sent at once to the Philippines, and the city was surrendered after a brief bombardment on May 17, 1898.

German passport Swiss issued Philippines Islands 1921

By the treaty of peace with Spain signed on Dec. 10, 1898, the entire archipelago was ceded to the United States. On June 12th, however, a rebellion broke out headed by Emilio Aguinaldo, who proclaimed the independence of the Philippine Islands. This resulted in a protracted series of operations in which Aguinaldo was finally captured on March 23, 1901. This put an end to active opposition, although it was necessary to pacify the islands by a series of expeditions, some of which resulted in considerable losses to American troops. Peace was finally brought about. The first session of the Philippine Legislature was held on Oct. 15, 1907. Although peace has prevailed in the islands, there has been a very definite attempt to bring about their independence by peaceful means, and by propaganda carried on both in the Philippines and the United States. The American Congress had expressed a desire to give their sovereignty to the Filipinos when they had reached a state of development which would justify it. Native leaders who desire the independence urge that this point has already been achieved.

On the whole, the people of the islands have been satisfied with American rule. They have reached the point of economic and intellectual development, which they failed to achieve during the hundreds of years of Spanish domination. During the World War, a regiment was organized, and although it was not called upon for active service, it was ready to give such services if they were needed.

Population.—The last census of the islands was taken in 1918 when the population was 10,350,640. Of these, about 8,500,000 are Christians, 316,000 Mohammedan, and 620,000 pagans. The population of Manila, the main city, in 1918, was 283,613, of whom 245,500 were Filipinos. Exclusive of the Army and Navy, there are about 5,000 Americans in the islands, chiefly in Manila.

Copyright, L. L. Poates Eng. Co., 1921

German passport Swiss issued Philippines Islands 1921