US Diplomatic Passports 1952

Look at these two awesome diplomatic passports which are in quite unusual red and green leather covers with golden imprint, including names and even passport number. Their bearers were Navy Lieutenant Orland Charles Harp (Attache to the US embassy in at Baghdad, Iraq) and his wife, Janet Sowell Harp. Both documents were issued in 1952. Charles passport has 48 pages plus another 14 extension pages, which gives a total of 62 pages full of interesting visas and stamps. Diplomatic visas are from Iraq, Lebanon, Syria, Cyprus, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and Aden Colony. Her passport has as well 48 pages but is not as traveled as his. Great collectibles in unusual covers.

The latest rank of Orland Charles Harp was Lt Cmdr, US Navy, he served in WWII, Korea & Vietnam. He died in 2009 and is buried at Pensacola, Escambia County, Florida, USA, Plot: A-22 A 12 – together with his wife Janet who died in 2014.

US Diplomatic Passports 1952 with Leather Covers Us diplomatic passport

Two Awesome US Diplomatic Passports Including Unusual Leather Covers

 

US Ambassador in Iraq back then was  Burton Yost Berry (August 31, 1901 – August 22, 1985) was an American diplomat and art collector.

Born in Fowler, Indiana, Berry studied at Indiana University. In 1928 he joined the United States Foreign Service. Berry served as Vice-Consul to Istanbul from 1929 to 1931, Consul to Athens in 1938, Istanbul 1943, Bucharest in 1944, Director of the State Department’s Office of African, South Asian and Near East Affairs in 1947, Budapest in 1948, and as Ambassador to Iraq from 1952 to 1954. He then retired, and lived in Istanbul, Beirut, Cairo and finally in Zürich.

Early on in his career, Berry began to collect Middle Eastern textiles coins, gems, jewelry, and other antiques. The textiles collection was donated to the Art Institute of Chicago. Many of the coins were donated to the American Numismatic Society. Much of the rest was donated to the Indiana University Art Museum.

US Diplomatic Passports 1952 with Leather Covers

The Life Of a US Diplomatic Courier – Ten Million Miles