US Passport 1919 Tokyo

Roland S. (Sletor) Morris (March 11, 1874 – November 23, 1945) was a leader of the Democratic Party in Pennsylvania and was the ambassador to Japan from 1917-1921.  A Non-career appointee, State of Residence: Pennsylvania. Appointed: August 1, 1917, Presentation of Credentials: October 30, 1917, Termination of Mission: Left Japan May 15, 1920.

Finding a US passport from Tokyo/Japan from this period is very rare. In fact, this is the first one I saw in 15+ years. Unfortunately, I missed this fantastic travel document at an auction.

The United States and Japan granted each other formal recognition on March 31, 1854, when Special Ambassador of the United States to Japan Matthew C. Perry and Japanese representatives signed a Treaty of Peace and Amity at Kanagawa, Japan. On July 8, 1853, Commodore Perry had sailed into the harbor of Japan’s capital of Edo (now Tokyo) and delivered a letter from President Millard Fillmore to the Emperor of Japan announcing that the United States sought to open relations with Japan and that Perry would return later to do so. However, this letter did not carry the force of formal recognition, which had to wait until the treaty of 1854.

The United States established consular relations with Japan when Townsend Harris accepted an appointment as Consul to Shimoda on August 4, 1855. The Consulate was established in Shimoda soon thereafter. US Passport 1919 Tokyo

The United States established additional Consulates in Japan:

  • Kanagawa (1862);
  • Nagasaki (1862);
  • Hakodate (1865);
  • Osaka (1868);
  • Tokyo (1869);
  • Yokohama (1897);
  • Kobe (1902);
  • Shimonoseki (1918);
  • Yokkaichi (1918);
  • Fukuoka (1950);
  • Sapporo (1950).

These dates reflect the earliest date at which a consul or consul-general (as opposed to a vice-consul, consular agent, or commercial agent) was either appointed to or arrived at each post. Full diplomatic relations were established on July 29, 1858, with the signing of a Treaty of Amity and Commerce by U.S. Consul General Townsend Harris and Japanese representatives at the Japanese capital of Edo (Tokyo).

US Passport 1919 Tokyo